Carving History with Water.

 
Origin Date 2004. Hasselblad XPan Film Camera, Fuji Velvia 50, plate no. 24

Origin Date 2004. Hasselblad XPan Film Camera, Fuji Velvia 50, plate no. 24

Our past is preserved in the smoothing of stones; the smashing, the pounding, the rounding of rocks. Through centuries of water wielding upon our shores and riverbanks, or through the erosion of exposed beaches and cliffs,  our story of time exists in the mad encounters of water upon land.

And nowhere is that more apparent than amidst steep hillsides of sugar maple and pine, where imprints of time are drenched by the waters of the Sturgeon River.

Origin Date 2003, Pentax 67 MF Film Camera, Fuji Velvia 50, plate no. 8

Origin Date 2003, Pentax 67 MF Film Camera, Fuji Velvia 50, plate no. 8

Gentle ponds and terraces give way to shale-lined oxbows and rushing falls, while the Sturgeon River moves gingerly between them.   In some places, the river has applied the strength of modern machinery, cutting gorges hundreds of feet high. In other places, gentle trickles of water have etched feeble stone with the precision of a fine jeweler. Throughout the riverbed, plates of shale and igneous rock seem to appear out of nowhere, invariably stacked with unity upon the tree lined bank, leaving bold clues about yesterday’s weather.

Origin Date 2004. Hasselblad XPan Film Camera, Fuji Velvia 50, plate no. 21

The Sturgeon River and its main tributary the Little Silver River provide more than deep canyons and volcanic outcroppings, between the hard-edged cuttings or the perfectly smoothed stones, they provide proof that we live in a changing world, and will continue to do so, as long as there is rock, and as long as there is water.

- Michigan, The Spirit of the Land; author Kathy-jo Wargin

 
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